Surveillance and Human Rights

Work Stream Two analyses key human rights concerns relating to security, discrimination and societal implications and uses this analysis to examine existing national regulatory responses.

This Work Stream assesses the human rights impacts of the use of technology and big data for surveillance in the context of security, discrimination and broader societal implications. Following from this, the Work Stream considers the extent to which existing privacy and data protection guarantees at the national level protect against, or enable, potential infringements of rights protections. Both components question whether the collection and use of data necessitates a reconceptualisation of privacy, and a rethinking of broader human rights protections. Analysis of disparate national contexts will inform, and be situated against, the overarching themes developed within Work Stream One.

Accordingly, this Work Stream will assess the extent and adequacy of regulation at the national level. Currently, the collection and use of data is regulated mainly through data protection regimes. The adequacy of these regimes in the USA, the United Kingdom, Germany, Brazil and India will be addressed.

Blog

  • Apr182017

    The Police’s Data Visibility – Part 2: The Limitations of Data Visibility for Predicting Police Misconduct

    Editor’s note: This is the second of a two-part blog post examining the potential impact of data visibility on law enforcement. In…

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    HRBDT
  • Apr182017

    The Police’s Data Visibility – Part 1: How Data Can Be Used To Monitor Police Work and How It Could Be Used To Predict Fatal Force Incidents

    Editor’s note: This is the first of a two-part blog post examining the potential impact of data visibility on law enforcement. The…

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    HRBDT
  • Mar082017

    Data Driven Policing: Highlighting Some Risks Associated with Predicting Crime

    The Human Rights, Big Data and Technology Project (the Project) recently made a submission to the UK Home Affairs Committee…

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    HRBDT
  • Nov162016

    Big Data, Mass Surveillance, and The Human Rights, Big Data & Technology Project

    Editor’s note: This post forms part of a larger series addressing key issues related to human rights, technology and big data.  Digital…

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    HRBDT
  • Feb022016

    After Paris, it’s traditional detective work that will keep us safe, not mass surveillance

    Published on The Conversation on 19 November 2015.  Before the dust has even settled from the attacks on Paris, familiar…

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    HRBDT

Our Partners

University of Cambridge
Eye Witness Media
FXB Center for Health & Human Rights
Human Rights Data Analysis Group
Universal Rights Group
World Health Organisation
Geneva Academy